LSD


Origin
Lysergic acid diethylamide, LSD-25, LSD, formerly lysergide, commonly known as acid
LSD was first synthesized by Albert Hofmann in 1938 from ergot, a grain fungus that typically grows on rye.
LSD is sensitive to oxygen, ultraviolet light, and chlorine, especially in solution, though its potency may last for years if it is stored away from light and moisture at low temperature.
LSD's psychedelic properties were discovered when Hofmann accidentally ingested an unknown quantity of the chemical. The first intentional ingestion of LSD occurred on April 19, 1943, when Dr. Hofmann ingested 250 µg of LSD. He hypothesized this would be a threshold dose based on the dosages of other ergot alkaloids. Hofmann found the effects to be much stronger than he anticipated.
LSD is not considered addictive, in that its users do not exhibit the medical community's commonly accepted definitions of addiction and physical dependence.


Appearance
In pure form it is a colourless, odourless, and mildly bitter solid.


Street Names
LSD is sold under more than 80 street names including: acid, blotter, cid, doses, and trips, as well as names that reflect the designs on sheets of blotter paper.

Routes of administration
LSD is typically delivered orally, usually on a substrate such as absorbent blotter paper, a sugar cube, or gelatin.
In its liquid form, it can be administered by intramuscular or intravenous injection.
The threshold dosage level needed to cause a psychoactive effect on humans is between 20 and 30 µg (micrograms).


Effects
LSD causes expansion and an altered experience of senses, emotions, memories, time, and awareness for 6 to 14 hours, depending on dosage and tolerance. Generally beginning within thirty to ninety minutes after ingestion, the user may experience anything from subtle changes in perception to overwhelming cognitive shifts.


Physical Effects
The following symptoms have been reported: uterine contractions, hypothermia, fever, elevated levels of blood sugar, goose bumps, increase in heart rate, jaw clenching, perspiration, pupil-dilation, saliva production, mucus production, sleeplessness, hyperreflexia, and tremors.
Some users report a strong metallic taste for the duration of the effects. LSD users have reported numbness, weakness and nausea.
LSD's psychological effects (colloquially called a "trip") vary greatly from person to person, depending on factors such as previous experiences, state of mind and environment, as well as dose strength.
They also vary from one trip to another, and even as time passes during a single trip.
An LSD trip can have long-term psychoemotional effects; some users cite the LSD experience as causing significant changes in their personality and life perspective.
Some psychological effects may include an experience of radiant colours, objects and surfaces appearing to ripple or "breathe," coloured patterns behind the eyes, a sense of time distorting (time seems to be stretching, repeating itself, changing speed or stopping), crawling geometric patterns overlaying walls and other objects, morphing objects, a sense that one's thoughts are spiralling into themselves, loss of a sense of identity or the ego (known as "ego death"), and other powerful psycho-physical reactions.
Many users experience a dissolution between themselves and the "outside world". This unitive quality may play a role in the spiritual and religious aspects of LSD. The drug sometimes leads to disintegration or restructuring of the user's historical personality and creates a mental state that some users report allows them to have more choice regarding the nature of their own personality.
If the user is in a hostile or otherwise unsettling environment, or is not mentally prepared for the powerful distortions in perception and thought that the drug causes, effects are more likely to be unpleasant than if he or she is in a comfortable environment and has a relaxed, balanced and open mindset.


Withdrawal Effects
Tolerance for LSD is short-lived and is lost if the user stops taking the drug for several days. There is no evidence that LSD produces physical withdrawal symptoms when chronic use is stopped.


Overdose
Two long-term effects; persistent psychosis and hallucinogen persisting perception disorder (HPPD), more commonly referred to as "flashbacks," have been associated with use of LSD. The causes of these effects, which in some users occur after a single experience with the drug, are not known.
Estimates for the lethal dosage (LD50) of LSD range from between 200 µg/kg to more than 1 mg/kg of human body mass, though most sources report that there are no known human cases of such an overdose

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